dog-condition

ONE THING LEADS TO ANOTHER

This is exactly how classical conditioning works, a stimulus — in this case, an odor — evokes an emotional memory. This is powerful stuff! The physical mechanisms that classical conditioning utilize are different from other kinds of learning. The associations are very durable – they take a long time to be forgotten, if ever. The associations also seem to involve parts of the brain involved with emotion, although this is still under study. But we have all experienced Read more…

REDIRECT TO AN ALTERNATE BEHAVIOR

Redirection is another technique in the Applied Behavior Analysis toolbox. This is also a form of differential reinforcement: DRO or Differential Reinforcement of an Other behavior. You’ve likely heard or read something similar to dogs. Redirect a puppy that is chewing on hands or furniture to a toy. Redirect a dog displaying fearful or aggressive behavior to an alternative, such as targeting or eye contact. It can work in the short term, which can be a blessing Read more…

puppy-training
dog-training-abcs

Solving a problem with the ABCs

Let’s look at the ABCs series thus far, especially this post, and see how we can apply the ABCs to solving a real problem. I like this problem as an example for the ABCs because the components in the formula are clear and easy to identify. Antecedent -> Behavior -> ConsequencePerson Approaches -> Dog jumps up onto person -> Attention is given to dog The antecedent is “person approaches”. It’s not “dog sees a person.” This is Read more…

My dog keeps taking stuff!

It seems like your dog is always stealing something. Your dog steals your shoes. Your dog steals your socks. Your dog steals your remote control. Your steals your Crocs. (Sorry. I’m a Dr. Seuss fan.) Stealing things can be very rewarding for a dog. Most dogs love to put anything and everything in their mouths. Many dogs also love to chase and be chased, and nothing gets that started quite like stealing an iPhone or Read more…

dog keep taking stuff
Dogs attention

“Yes!” – what it means in dog training

Dog training is about communication. We don’t know what our dogs are thinking, or even how they think. Chances are though, it’s not in the sentences and paragraphs that we humans tend to use. But we can communicate with them. The most basic form of communication in dog training is a positive reward marker. It is a signal (usually audible) indicating that the behavior being performed at that very moment is correct or desirable. Some dog trainers use Read more…

How to get your dog to pay attention to you

“My dog ignores me!” “My dog knows what I want. She’s blowing me off!” “My dog doesn’t pay attention to me.” Do these complaints sound familiar? Without our dogs’ attention, we can’t accomplish very much. Attention, just like any other behavior, can be reinforced and put on cue. In other words, attention can be trained. How do we know when we have a dog’s attention? The same way we do with people: our good old friend eye contact. When Read more…

your dog attention
how to pay dogs attention

Attention: How to get your dog to pay it to you

Why does your dog pull on the leash? Because she’s not paying attention to you: she’s paying attention to the tree, hydrant, dog, or piece of dust she’s trying to get to. Why doesn’t your dog come to you when you call? Because he’s paying attention to where he is (or where he’s going) instead of you. How do you get attention? By being more interesting than everything else. This doesn’t mean that your dog should only have Read more…

Dog training builds relationships

Hi there! I want to share with you an amazing story about Eric and his dog. And how is important training to build relationships: Buddha was an adult when we adopted him. He wasn’t fully house-trained and had no notion of using a crate. He was very agreeable around both people and dogs, but there was always an undercurrent of independence and, to use that word again, aloofness to him. Any physical affection was brief Read more…

train your dog in crate

Should I Crate train my dog?

Crate training can be a confusing issue for some dog owners, especially those adopting a rescue or shelter dog. The idea of confining a dog to a cage seems a little bit cruel – maybe even inhumane – but many dog trainers and behaviorists seem to recommend it. What’s the real deal? A crate can be a powerful training and management tool, but it is not always necessary. It is most useful under two circumstances: housetraining a Read more…

How to play tug

Playing tug is a great way to have fun, bond with your dog, and provide him or her with important exercise and mental stimulation. Fitting it into your dog’s exercise regimen has many benefits for both you and her. Some clients are surprised that I recommend playing tug because they have been told it teaches dogs to bite or develop other nasty habits. Others have been told to make sure they always win because of Read more…

how to play tug with dog